How to claim compensation if your train journey is delayed: Held up by Storm Emma, here’s how to get your money back

The Beast from the East, otherwise known as Storm Emma, has caused rail delays up and down the UK. But don’t worry, if you pay for annual train tickets and your journey has been delayed you can get your money back!

How to claim compensation if your train journey is delayed: Held up by Storm Emma, here’s how to get your money back

Unfortunately, it’s not really as straightforward as you’d probably like it to be. You’ll have to jump through some hoops and fill out some forms, probably also wait quite a while to be compensated too. But, if you do manage to get some money back, those sweet-sweet savings are certainly worth it.

Methods of compensation differ between modes of transportation and individual train lines so you’ll have to do a bit of digging to find out which method is the right one for you.

READ NEXT: How the Met Office names storms

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How to get money back if your train is delayed or cancelled by bad weather

You’re not going to like this news but, unfortunately, UK rail services don’t compensate for train journeys delayed or cancelled by severe weather. You can still apply if you like, as rail services do offer compensation for unexpected delays and weather can sometimes fall into this bracket.

The “Delay Repay” scheme means that, if you’re a weekly, monthly or season-ticket holder, you’ll be entitled to some money back if hit by an unexpected delay. You’re entitled to compensation each time for any delay of 30 minutes or more to your journey. Season-ticket holders need to apply compensation claims for delays on specific trains, so make sure you note down the correct travel information at the time of the delay.

You’ll have to head to each individual rail company to deal with your complaint and access your compensation. Thankfully, National Rail has a handy link to all of the right pages.

If you don’t fancy doing your application online, you can also head to a staffed station to pick up a claims form that can be filled out and mailed to the rail operator along with your ticket.

READ NEXT: Five reasons to be proud of Britain’s trains

How to get money back if your Overground or TfL Rail journey was delayed or cancelled

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Transport for London allows you to claim a refund on a delayed journey on TfL Rail and Overground lines. You can even claim back online with relatively little fuss. However, there are some caveats before you head over to the TfL claims site to get your money back.

Firstly, if your journey was delayed because of strike action, security alerts, bad weather, customer incidents – such as people falling ill on the train or pulling an alarm incorrectly – and engineering works, you won’t be able to claim a refund. If your journey was also delayed by over an hour on a London Overground or TfL Rail service that included travel outside the pay as you go area and this caused you to arrive over an hour late to your destination, your refund will be calculated according to National Rails’ terms.

If you’d rather claim your refund by post, instead of via TfL’s online form, you’ll need to record your journey details, the method of payment and contact details too. You can find that information via the link above.

How to get money back if your London Underground or DLR journey was delayed or cancelled

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If your journey on the Tube or DLR was delayed by more than 15 minutes, you may have a case for compensation.

Just like with TfL Rail and Overground services, TfL doesn’t give refunds on journeys held up by strike action, security alerts, bad weather, customer incidents – such as people falling ill on the train or pulling an alarm incorrectly – and engineering works. You also won’t get a refund if you travel using a Freedom Pass, 60+ Oyster photocard, Veterans Oyster photocard or you’re under the age of 11.

You’ll also have to claim within 28 days of your delay.

If you meet all those requirements, you can claim your refund online via TfL’s claims website.

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