No more wires! Samsung patents ‘over the air’ wireless tech that charges multiple gadgets at the same time

The Samsung patent would allow you to charge your phone no matter where you are in the room

23 Mar 2018
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Charging with wires is the bane of my existence and mainstream “wireless” solutions aren’t much better – namely because you still need to plug the wireless base unit into the mains.

Now, it appears Samsung has heard our first-world plea and patented ‘over the air’, true wireless charging technology.

The patent, filed back in 2016 in South Korea, has just been published in the World Intellectual Property Organisation’s database. It describes ‘true wireless’ technology that can wirelessly focus energy to a device in the same room.

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Using panels called ‘reflectors’, the technology can bend signals around obstacles and people, meaning you can still move while charging your phone. The patent itself isn’t actually all that detailed, and there’s no information on how efficient or effective the technology will actually be. There’s also no guarantee this will ever hit the market, seeing as it’s just a patent, but it's still exciting.

 There is a multitude of smaller companies working on true wireless technology, though.

Ossia, for example, has been pioneering the innovation with its Kota tiles, which let people charge their phones from afar without the use of wires. Unfortunately, it’s really only being used in industrial settings. The company also recently unveiled the Forever Battery, an AA battery that never dies.

Then there’s Energous, which unveiled a transmitter that uses radiofrequency (RF) to charge any devices within range. The three feet range transmitter received FCC approval back in December.

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Like with most things, once a prominent smartphone manufacturer, like Samsung, takes the first step and introduces true wireless technology, many will swiftly follow. Fingers crossed we’ll see this come to fruition.

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